Don Shomette

People are the Prize


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Categories: How To Know When a Student is a Threat

We live in a world of full of categories. Your country, state, faith, profession…these and many others may be a category for you. Categories are not a bad thing since they can help us to better understand a person and maybe even to predict their future behaviors.
When it comes to preventing violence, every student falls into one of two categories. Those who will not use violence to get what they want and those who will use violence to get what they want.
In conducting a student threat assessment, you must first determine what category the student falls into–will they use violence or will they not use violence? After that, it’s all about trying to lower the risk level.

 


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Success: 2 Elements Students Must Have to be Truly Successful

50% success is good, but isn’t 100% better?

I think we fail our students (and make our schools less safe) when we don’t address both elements that are necessary for real student success. Without a doubt, academic success is critical but so is ethical success!

Starting today, never discuss academic success again without also reminding (encouraging, requiring, demanding!) your students that their goal is to achieve both academic and ethical success.

It’s the only way they can really enjoy 100% success!

 


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Townville School Attack: Points to Consider

Why would the school attacker yell, “I hate my life” and then began to shoot at students and teachers?

In this video, I go over some of the actions and behaviors of last week’s school attacker in South Carolina as well as discuss one more alarming commonality that is prevalent among school attackers. Namely, first murdering their parents and/or love ones.

 

 

 


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Today’s Word is Example

For the next 30 days, I’m going to post a short video that focuses on a word (or phrase) of the day. Most will be about preventing violence, some on leadership, a few on strategy, but all about personal growth.

It comes from a group of college students assigned a class exercise in which they have to make some hard and quick decisions about life and death. The results are surprising, encouraging, and helps to show us how example is important to character.